Free Hotels Price Comparison Tool
 
Select Language
   
 
HotelsBot.com : Free compare hotels rates tool from top travel sites
Download compare hotels on the iPhone
Compare Hotels Rates !
now on the iPhone
download for free
Home About Us Flights Hotels Car Rental
You are here : Home | World | Africa | Egypt
 
 

See

Highlights of any visit to Egypt would include:

  • the Pyramids
  • the Egyptian Museum
  • the temples of Luxor and the West Bank across the Nile
  • the Valley of the Kings
  • the Library of Alexandria
  • the Temples of Abu Simbel

When you're done with the historical touring don't miss:

  • The Red Sea resorts at Sinai peninsula, including Dahab, Hurghada, and Sharm el Sheikh. The Red Sea offers some of the best dive locations in the world.
  • The rest of Sinai. There are a multitude of locations to visit in Sinai. These range from secluded beaches with little more than huts, to climbing Mt. Sinai.
  • The Western Desert and the Oases
  • Alexandria. Home to many historical sights and the stunning new Bibliotheca Alexandrina.

Talk

The official language of Egypt is the Egyptian dialect of Modern Arabic. Egyptian Arabic differs in that the letter jim is pronounced g instead of j. Travelers are unlikely to encounter difficulties finding someone who speaks English, especially in tourist centers. Egyptians are eager to improve their English, and so offering a few new words or gently correcting their mistakes is appreciated.

Following usual rules of politeness, instead of simply starting a conversation with someone in English, ask "Do you speak English?". All the more better if you can do it in Arabic: inta/inti aarif il-inglezi? "Do you (male/female) know English?".

Buy

The local currency is the Egyptian pound (EGP), which is divided into 100 piastres. The currency is often written as LE (short for French livre égyptienne) or by using the pound sign £. In Arabic the pound is called gunaih (جنيه), in turn derived from English "guinea", and piastres are known as qirsh (قرش).

Banknotes are available in all denominations ranging from 200 pounds to the thoroughly useless 5 piastres, while coins were rather rare until new 50-piastre and 1-pound coins were introduced in the summer of 2006. Counterfeit or obsolete notes are not a major problem, but exchanging pounds outside the country can be difficult.

Foreign currencies can be exchanged at exchange offices or banks, so there is no need to resort to the dodgy street moneychangers. Many higher-end hotels price in dollars or euros and will gladly accept them as payment.

American Express, Diners Club, MasterCard and Visa are accepted, but only bigger hotels or restaurants in Cairo and restaurants in tourist areas will accept credit cards as payment. Traveller's checks can be exchanged in any bank, but like all Egyptian bureaucracy, it will take a while. ATMs are ubiquitous in the cities and probably the best option overall.

Bank hours are Sun-Thu 8:30am-2:00pm.

Tipping

Tips or baksheesh are an integral part of Egyptian culture. You are expected to tip pretty much everybody who does a service for you, and Egyptians will not hesitate to bluntly ask you for baksheesh. Keep a stack of small bills handy for tips — no change is given! Some general guidelines:

  • Bathroom attendants: LE 1
  • Cruises: LE 10/day, to be divided by all staff on board
  • Guide: LE 25-30/day
  • Hotel bellman: LE 5 per bag
  • Hotel doorman: LE 10 for services rendered (flagging down taxis etc)
  • Restaurants: In fancier restaurants, a service charge (10-12%) is added to bills, but a 5-10% tip on top of that is common. In fast-food places, tipping is unnecessary.
  • Taxi drivers: 10% on metered fares, but not necessary if you agreed the fare in advance
  • Site custodians: LE 5 if they do something useful, none otherwise
  • Tour drivers: LE 10/day

An exception: if you ask a stranger for directions, tips are not necessary and may even be considered offensive. Also, officials in uniform should not be tipped, even though a good few will ask you. (Paying officials baksheesh as bribes, not tips, is another story, but beyond the scope of this guide and illegal to boot.)

Last but not least, beware that as foreign tourists, you are seen by many as easy money and you should not let yourself be pressured into tipping for unnecessary or unrequested "services" like self-appointed tour guides latching on to you.

Shopping

Egypt is a shopper's paradise - especially if you're interested in Egyptian-themed souvenirs and kitsch. However, there are also a number of high quality goods for sale, often at bargain prices. Some of the most popular purchases include:

  • Antiques (NB: not antiquities, the trade of which is rightly illegal in Egypt)
  • Carpets and rugs
  • Cotton goods and clothing Can be bought at Khan E Khalli for around 30-40 EGP
  • Inlaid goods, such as backgammon boards
  • Jewellery Cartouches make a great souvenir. These are metal plates shaped like an elongated oval and have engravings of your name in hieroglyphics
  • Leather goods
  • Music
  • Papyrus
  • Perfume - Perfumes can be bought at almost every souvenir shop. Make sure that you ask the salesman to prove to you that there is no alcohol mixed with the perfume. The standard rates should be in the range of 1-2 Egyptian Pounds / gm
  • Water-pipes (Sheeshas)
  • Spices - can be bought at colourful stalls in most Egyptian markets. Dried herbs and spices are generally of a higher quality than that available in Western supermarkets and are up to 4 or 5 times cheaper, though the final price will depend of bargaining and local conditions.

When shopping in markets or dealing with street vendors, remember to haggle.

You will also find many western brands all around. There are many malls in Egypt, the most common being Citystars Mall, which is the largest entertainment center in the Middle East and Africa. You will find all the fast food restaurants you want such as Mcdonald's, KFC, Hardees, Pizza Hut, etc. Clothing brands such as Morgan, Calvin Klein, Levi's, Facconable, Givenchy, Esprit, and more.

Eat

Egypt can be a fantastic place to sample a unique range of food: not too spicy and well-flavoured with herbs. For a convenient selection of Egyptian cuisine and staple foods try the Felfela chain of restaurants in Cairo. Some visitors complain, however, that these have become almost too tourist-friendly and have abandoned some elements of authenticity.

As in many seaside countries, Egypt is full of fish restaurants and markets--so fish and seafood are must-try. Frequently, fish markets have some food stalls nearby where you can point at specific fish species to be cooked. Stalls typically have shared table, and locals are as frequent there as tourists.

Hygiene

Be aware that hygiene may not be of the highest standards, depending on the place. The number of tourists that suffer from some kind of parasite or bacterial infection is very high. Despite assurances to the contrary, exercise common sense and bring appropriate medications to deal with problems.

Local dishes

Classic egyptian dishes: The dish Ful Medames is one of the most common egyptian dishes; consists of fava beans (ful) slow-cooked in a copper pot (other types of metal pots don't produce the right type of flavor) that have been partially or entirely mashed. Olive oil is often an ingredient, and garlic is sometimes added. Ful medames is served with plenty of olive oil, chopped parsley, onion, garlic, and lemon juice, and typically eaten with Egyptian (baladi) bread or occasionally Levantine (shami) pita. Also sometimes seasoned with chili paste and tumeric.

A world famous Egyptian dish is the classic Falafel (known as Ta'miya in Egypt) which is deep-fried ground chick-pea balls that was invented by Egyptian bedouins. Usually served as fast food, or a snack.

Koshary is a famous dish ,which is usually a mixture of macaroni, lentils, rice, chickpeas and tomato sauce. Very popular amongst the locals and a must try for tourists.The gratinated variation is called Taagin.

Egyptian cuisine is quite similar to the cuisine of the Arabic-speaking countries in the Eastern Mediterranean. Dishes like stuffed vegetables and vine leafs, Shawarma-sandwiches are common in Egypt and the region.

Exotic fruits

Egypt is one of the most affordable countries for a European to try variety of fresh-grown exotic fruits. Guava, mango, watermelon, small melons, ishta are all widely available from fruit stalls, especially in locals-oriented non-tourist marketplaces.

Drink

See also Stay healthy:Fluids section for hygiene and related info.

Water

Bottled water is available everywhere. The local brands (most common being Baraka, Siwa, Hayat, Dasani) are just as good as expensive imported options which are also available: Nestle Pure Life, Evian.

Juices

Juices can be widely found in Egypt - kasab(sugar cane); erk soos (licorice); sobiia (white juice); tamer and some fresh fruit juices(almost found at same shop which offer all these kind of juices except erk soos may be which you can find another places).

Karkadae is also famous juice specially at Luxor and it is hibiscus tea which is drunk hot or cold but in Egypt it is preferred to drink it cold.Should mention also that hibiscus tea is known to lower blood pressure so be careful.

Alcoholic drinks

Egypt is a predominately Muslim nation and alcoholic drinks are forbidden (haram) for strictly observant Muslims. That said, Egyptians tend to adopt a relaxed and pragmatic view towards alcohol for non-Muslims and foreigners it is tolerated by the vast majority of Egyptians and consumed by a sizable number of them (including less strict Muslims - you may even be asked to "procure" drink for someone!) Alcoholic beverages and bottled drinks are readily available throughout the country (especially in larger towns and cities, as well as tourist centers). Please note, however, that public drunkenness (especially the loud and obnoxious variety) is definitely not appreciated - without caution, you may end up drying out in a police cell. Try to be a good ambassador: if you must get "tipsy", confine it to the hotel or very nearby! (It's actually quite rare to see drunken tourists, even in the most intense tourist areas...)

Stella (not artois) is a common beer in Egypt. Other local brands are available, most a with higher alcohol variant that have claimed levels of 8% or even 10%..

Restrictions on Alcohol

Egyptian laws towards alcohol are officially quite liberal compared to most Islamic countries, except for the month of Ramadan when alcohol is strictly forbidden. During Ramadan only holders of foreign passports are allowed to buy alcohol, by Egyptian law. However, the enforcement of this law is by no means consistent. In tourist areas like Luxor, alcohol is sold even during Ramadan, and those who look like foreigners will not be asked to show passports or other documentation.

During Ramadan alcohol is often sold only in Western-style hotels and pubs/restaurants catering especially to foreigners. A few days of the year, as the day of the full moon the month before Ramadan, alcohol is completely banned. Also some hotels and bars catering to foreigners will stop serving alcohol during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan - phone ahead to make sure alcohol is still being served in order to avoid disappointment.

 

Egypt

 

Egypt (Arabic: مصر Misr / Másr; more fully, the Arab Republic of Egypt, Arabic: جمهوريّة مصر العربيّة Gomhuriat Masr Al-Arabiah) [1] is a large country located in north-eastern Africa with its capital located in its largest city, Cairo. Egypt also extends into Asia by virtue of holding the Sinai Peninsula. Egypt is bordered by Israel and the Gaza Strip to the north-east, by Jordan and Saudi Arabia to the east (across the Red Sea), by Sudan to the south and by Libya to the west. The country is bounded by the Mediterranean and Red Seas (to the north and east respectively) and geographically dominated both by the River Nile and its fertile well-watered valley, and by the Eastern and Western deserts.

Egypt (together with its southern neighbour Sudan) is perhaps best known as the home of the ancient Egyptian civilization, with its temples, hieroglyphs, mummies, and - visible above all - its pyramids. Less well-known is Egypt's medieval heritage, courtesy of Coptic Christianity and Islam - ancient churches, monasteries and mosques punctuate the Egyptian landscape. Egypt stimulates the imagination of western tourists like few other countries and is probably one of the most popular tourist destinations world-wide.

Understand

History

The regularity and richness of the annual Nile River flood, coupled with semi-isolation provided by deserts to the east and west, allowed for the the development of one of the world's great civilizations. A unified kingdom arose around 3200 B.C. and a series of dynasties ruled in Egypt for the next three millennia. The last native dynasty fell to the Persians in 341 B.C., who in turn were replaced by the Greeks, Romans, and Byzantines. It was the Arabs who introduced Islam and the Arabic language in the 7th century and who ruled for the next six centuries. A local military caste, the Mamluks, took control about 1250 and continued to govern after the conquest by Egypt by the Ottoman Turks in 1517. Following the completion of the Suez Canal in 1869, Egypt became an important world transportation hub, but also fell heavily into debt. Ostensibly to protect its investments, Britain seized control of Egypt's government in 1882, but nominal allegiance to the Ottoman Empire continued until 1914. Partially independent from the UK in 1922, Egypt acquired full sovereignty following World War II. The completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1971 and the resultant Lake Nasser have altered the time-honored place of the Nile river in the agriculture and ecology of Egypt. A rapidly growing population (the largest in the Arab world), limited arable land, and dependence on the Nile all continue to overtax resources and stress society. The government has struggled to prepare the economy for the new millennium through economic reform and massive investment in communications and physical infrastructure.

Climate

Egypt is largely a desert, an extension of the great Sahara Desert that bands North Africa. Save for the thin strip of watered land along the river Nile, very little could survive here. As the ancient Greek philosopher Herodotus stated: "Egypt is the gift of the Nile".

Generally, dry and very hot summers with moderate winters - November through to March are definitely the most comfortable months for travel in Egypt. There is almost no rain in the Nile valley, so you won't be needing wet weather gear!

Holidays

Banks, shops and businesses will close for the following Egyptian National Holidays (civil, secular). Public transport may run only limited services:

  • 7th January (Eastern Orthothox Christmas)
  • 25th April (Liberation Day)
  • 1st May (Labour Day)
  • 23rd July (Revolution Day)
  • 6th October (Armed Forces Day)
  • 1st Shawwal,the 10th Hijri month (Eid Elfitr)
  • 10th Tho-Elhejjah, the 12th Hijri month (Eid Al-adha)

Ramadan

Ramadan dates

  • 2009 (1430): Aug 21 - Sep 19
  • 2010 (1431): Aug 11 - Sep 9
  • 2011 (1432): Aug 1 - Aug 29

The festival of Eid ul-Fitr is held after the end of Ramadan and may last several days. Exact dates depend on astronomical observations and may vary from country to country.

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar and the most important month in the Islamic Calendar for Muslims, the majority religion in Egypt. Commemorating the time when God revealed the Qur'an to Mohammed, during this holy month, Muslims abstain from eating, drinking or smoking until after sundown on each day. Although strict adherence to Ramadan is for Muslims only, some Muslims would appreciate that non-Muslims do not take meals or smoke in public places. During Ramadan, many restaurants and cafes won't open until after sundown. Public transport is less frequent, shops close earlier before sunset and the pace of life (especially business) is generally slow.

As expected, exactly at sunset minute, the entire country quiets down and busy itself with the main meal of the day (iftar or breaking-fast) that are almost always done as social events in large groups of friends. Many richer people offer (Tables of the Gracious God موائد الرحمن ) in Cairo's streets that cater full-meals for free for the passers-by, the poorer ones or workers who couldn't leave their shifts at the time. Prayers become popular 'social' events that some like to enrich with special food treats before and after. An hour or two later, an astonishing springing to life of the cities takes place. Streets sometimes richly decorated for the whole month have continuous rush hours till very early in the morning. Some Shops and Cafes make the biggest chunk of their annual profit at this time of year. Costs of advertising on TV and Radio soars for this period and entertainment performances are at their peak.

Terrain

Egypt consists of vast desert plateau interrupted by the Nile valley and delta.

Regions

A map of Egypt's regions and major destinations
Lower Egypt
containing the northern Nile delta, and the Mediterranean coast; Cairo, Alexandria
Middle Egypt
the area along the Nile where the historical Upper and Lower kingdoms met
Upper Egypt
a string of amazing temple towns located on the southern stretch of the Nile
Western Desert
location of the Western Oases: five pockets of green, each with their own unique attractions
Red Sea Coast
Luxury beach resorts, diving and marine life
Sinai
Rugged and isolated peninsula, with fascinating relics of the past and great scuba diving

Cities

  • Cairo – the capital of Egypt, home to the Giza Pyramids, the Egyptian Museum and fabulous Islamic architecture
  • Alexandria – Egypt's window on the Mediterranean, with still-palpable glimpses of the past
  • Aswan – a more relaxed option, full of amazing sights
  • Luxor – gateway to the Valley of the Kings, amongst other fabulous attractions
  • Hurghada – a town on the Red Sea, filled with all-inclusive resorts and diving

Other destinations

  • Abu Simbel – a very remote town in the far south, with some beautiful ancient temples
  • Dahab – backpacker central, with excellent scuba diving
  • Lake Nasser – created by the Aswan Dam
  • Memphis & Saqqara – both filled with relics and ruins of ancient Egypt, they're often combined as a day trip from Cairo
  • Sharm el-Sheikh – a hugely popular resort town on the Sinai peninsula, with some of the best scuba diving in the world
  • Siwa – a stunning remote oasis near the Libyan border
  • Marsa Matroh – a stunning remote city on the Mediterranean sea
  • Northern shore – a stunning set of resorts along the coastline by the Mediterranean sea

Get in

Visas and Documentation

There are three types of Egyptian visa:

  • Tourist Visa - usually valid for a period not exceeding 3 months and granted on either a single or multiple entry basis (visas are not chargeable when visiting the red sea resorts of Taba and Sharm-el-Sheik)
  • Entry Visa - required for any foreigner arriving in Egypt for purposes other than tourism, e.g. work, study, etc. The possession of a valid Entry Visa is needed to complete the residence procedure in Egypt.
  • Transit Visa

Non-Egyptian travellers are required to have a valid passport.

Entry visas may be obtained from Egyptian Diplomatic and Consular Missions Abroad or from the Entry Visa Department at the Travel Documents, Immigration and Nationality Administration (TDINA).

Citizens of many countries may obtain a visa on arrival at major points of entry. The fees for a single-entry visa are as follows:

  • UK citizens: £15
  • US citizens: US$15
  • Irish citizens: €15 / US$15
  • Australian citizens: A$45
  • Canadian citizens: C$26
  • other countries: US$15

Please check with your nearest Egyptian Consular mission for more details concerning visa regulations applying to your citizenship.

Citizens of Kuwait can obtain 6-month Residence Permit upon arrival.

Citizens of Bahrain, Guinea, South Korea, Libya, Oman, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and Yemen receive a 3 month visa on arrival.

Malaysian citizens receive a 15 day visa on arrival.

Citizens of following countries are currently required to have a pre-arrival visa, which must be applied for through an Eqyptian consulate or embassy outside of Egypt:

Afghanistan, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, China (People's Republic of; except Hong Kong and Macau), Croatia, Georgia, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Iran, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kirghizia, Lebanon, Macedonia, Malaysia (If intending to stay for exceeding 15 days), Moldova, Montenegro, Morocco, Pakistan, Palestine, the Philippines, Russia, Serbia, Slovenia, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and all African countries (except citizens of Guinea and Libya, who do not require visa).

Visitors entering Egypt at the overland border post of Taba or at Sharm el Sheikh airport can be exempted from a visa and granted a free fourteen day residence permit to visit the Aqaba coast of the Sinai peninsula, including Sharm el Sheikh, Dahab and St. Catherine's Monastery.

Those in possession of a residence permit in Egypt are not required to obtain an entry visa if they leave the country and return to it within the validity of their residence permit or within six months, whichever period is less.

Tourists visiting Sharm-El-Sheikh who are planning to undertake scuba diving outside local areas (i.e. Ras Mohammed) will need to obtain the tourist visa (£15 sterling, see above) as technically this will mean leaving the Sharm-el-Sheikh area and thus leads to the requirement for a visa to do so. Officials on boats may check dive boats whilst on the waters so you are advised not to try and sneak past this as there may be fines involved for you and the boat captain if you are caught without the appropriate visa. Most reputable dive centers will ask to see your visa before allowing you on trips.

By plane

Egypt has several international airports:

  • Cairo International Airport — the primary entry point and the hub of the national carrier Egypt Air .
  • Alexandria Nozha
  • Luxor International Airport — now receiving an increasing number of international scheduled flights in addition to charter flights.
  • Aswan International Airport
  • Hurghada International Airport — receives a number of charter flights
  • Sharm El-Sheikh International Airport — receives a number of charter flights
  • Burg Al-Arab International Airport

By car

Gas is rather inexpensive in Egypt. Gas Prices in May 2008 have reached USD Regular/Gallon $1.25. So if you decide to rent a car, you will not be digging through your pockets looking for a lot of money to fill your cars tank! Car rental sites require you to be at least 25-years-old.

By bus

Egypt can be accessed by bus from Israel (from the bus stations in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv).

By boat

A car ferry runs between Aqaba in Jordan and Nuweiba in the Sinai, tickets $50. A weekly ferry also runs between Wadi Halfa in Sudan, and Aswan in Egypt. There are also ferry boats available to and from Red Sea to ports in Saudi Arabia and Jordan.

A ferry running between the Red Sea resorts of Hurghada and Sharm-El-Sheikh is also available for a journey time of 90 minutes and 400 LE (approximately £40 sterling).

Get around

By train

The trains in Egypt are all run by Egyptian National Railways , a state-owned and -run company.

Train tickets can be bought at most major railway stations' booking offices once you are in Egypt, (although a great deal of patience is often required...)

Ramses Station in Cairo has several booking windows, for example, one for each class and group of destinations, so be sure to check with locals (usually very helpful) that you are joining the right queue. Train tickets can be paid for in Egyptian currency, except for the deluxe Abela Egypt sleeper which must be paid in foreign currency (dollars, euros or pounds sterling). An alternative to self-booking, if you don't mind paying a little commission to avoid the inevitable hassle and frustration, is to a local travel agent to buy tickets on your behalf (preferably at least the day before you intend to travel).

First Class tickets are relatively cheap and a good choice though Second Class is also completely tolerable. Travelers probably won't want to experience anything below Second Class (the condition and provision of toilets, for example, drops away quickly after this level). If you must travel at a lower class than desirable, look for the first opportunity to "upgrade" yourself into an empty seat - you may pay a small supplement when your ticket is checked, but it's worth it. Note that toilet facilities on Egyptian trains are at best rudimentary, even in first class. Therefore, it is advisable to prepare toiletries for long journeys.

Busy holiday periods excepted, it's not normally difficult to get 1st class tickets on the day of travel or the day before. To avoid complications, however, book as far ahead as possible.

By bus

Egypt has an extensive long-distance bus network. Buses are operated by private companies. Their names are Pullman, West Delta, Golden Arrow, Super Jet, East Delta, El Gouna, Upper Egypt Bus Co. Popular routes are operated by more than one company. Some bus companies allow you to book seats in advance, others are hop-on based upon availability of seats.

By taxi

In the cities taxis are a very safe, cheap and convenient way of getting around. It has to be noted that while they are mostly safe there are sometimes fake taxis going around so make sure they have official markings on the dashboard or elsewhere. They are also always painted in special colors, in Cairo they are black and white and in Luxor they are blue and white. In Cairo and Luxor it is often much more interesting to use the taxis and a good guidebook instead of traveling around in a tour bus.

All the taxis have meters but they are calibrated using a law from the 1970s before the oil crisis and are never used. Generally the best way is to ask at your hotel for the prices from point-to-point prices. Or ask a pedestrian or policemen for the correct price. It is sensible to state your price when you get in to reduce the possibilities of arguments after arriving at your destination.

Some believe that the best way is to tell the driver where to go and not mention a price. At the end of the journey you step out of the car and make sure you have everything with you and then hand out reasonable money. If the driver shouts, it's probably OK, but if he steps out of the car you almost certainly paid too little. The definition of reasonable seems to be variable but examples are 20 LE from central Cairo to Giza, 10 LE for a trip inside central Cairo and 5 LE for a short hop inside the city. Do not be tempted to give them too much except for exceptional service, otherwise ripping off foreigners will become more common and such practice generally tends to add to the inflation. Note that the prices listed here are already slightly inflated to the level expected from tourists, not what Egyptians would normally pay.

Taxis can also be hired for whole days for between 100-200 LE if going on longer excursions, for example to Saqqara and Dashur from Cairo. Inside the town they are also more than happy to wait for you (often for a small extra charge but normally they say it's free), even if you will be wandering around for a few hours.

English is often spoken by taxi drivers and they will double as guides, announcing important places when you drive by them. Of course they expect to be paid a little extra for that. This is not always the case and if you get your hands on a good english speaking driver it is wise to ask him for a card or a phone number, they can often be available at any time.

Very recently, a new line of taxis owned by private companies has been introduced to Cairo as a pilot project. They are all clean and air-conditioned. The drivers are formally dressed and can converse in at least one foreign language, usually English. These cabs stand out in their NYC-yellow. They can be hailed on the street if they are free or hired from one of their stops (including one in Tahrir square, downtown, across from the Museum). These new cabs use current meters which count by the kilometer but it starts from 3.50 pounds. In general, they are not more expensive than the normal taxis you can call this number from Cairo 16516 to ask for cap if you couldn't find it where you are looking.

By plane

The domestic air network is fairly extensive and covers most major towns in Egypt. The national carrier, EgyptAir , has the most regular services and is the easiest place to start looking before you go. From Cairo there are services to quite a few towns and places of interest around the country, the most common being Luxor, Aswan Abu Simbel, Hurghada, Sharm el-Sheikh, Alexandria, Marsa Matruh and Kharga oasis.

The previously employed two-tier pricing structure, which made fares more than four times as expensive for foreigners than locals was changed at the beginning of 2007 to a system in which everyone pays the same fare regardless of nationality. Fares are still relatively cheap — for example a return day trip to Luxor is about $170. It is wise to book early as flights fill up quickly in the peak season. Local travel agencies have internet web pages and can sometimes squeeze you in last minute, but booking in advance is recommended. Travelers can also check prices and book flights on EgyptAir Express's website.

Booking online is not suitable for last minute tickets as the online ticket sale closes 72h in advance. Travel agencies however can still make bookings. The national sales call center is unable to sell tickets over the phone, but directs you to a local travel agency, when not in the same location as you ask your hotelstaff about travel agencies nearby.

 
             
Asia Pacific
   
 
Europe  
 
Americas
 
Middle East

Africa
               

Download compare hotels on the iPhone
Compare Hotels Rates !
now on the iPhone
download for free
 
 
 
Copyright © 2013. HotelsBot.com. All rights reserved.